Cheers and Jeers

Cheers and Jeers

Cheers and Jeers

By Meg McIntire and Nicole Rivard

We have a cheer for the expansion of a state law that makes it legal for citizens to break the window of a car to free a trapped animal. Unfortunately, there are dozens of pets who die every year due to neglectful owners leaving them trapped in a car. The state of Tennessee took action to help prevent these tragedies. Fifth District Rep. David Hawk, from Greeneville, helped expand the Good Samaritan law, which allows someone to rescue a child from a vehicle for safety reasons. Now the law also prevents a person from being sued if they break into a car to save a cat or dog.

Cheers to the Bombay high court in the city of Mumbai, India, which recently ruled that horse-drawn carriages, also known as “Victorias,” are illegal and must be off the streets in a year. The court order resulted from a petition filed by animal rights groups that said the horses were malnourished and denied adequate care and rest. The court also ordered that all of the stables where the horses are kept must be closed down and directed authorities to come up with a scheme to rehabilitate those involved in the trade.


Jeers to the people who participated in a horrible event called “Giggin’ for Grads,” which was held on June 19 by The Dekalb County Farmers and Ranchers in Tennessee. Participants were allowed to go out at night and stab frogs with a sharp long weapon or pitchfork, which is a type of hunting called “gigging.” The people who finished with the heaviest bags won scholarship money. Friends of Animals, Nashville Animal Advocacy and other organizations created a petition to cancel this horrible event, which reached nearly 6,500 signatures. The only good news is that there was a much lower turnout than last year, according to the Nashville Animal Advocacy, who protested the event.

 

Jeers to New Jersey’s Fish and Game Council, which recently agreed to allow raccoon trappers to use cruel leg hold traps that FoA helped outlaw in 1984. The Department of Fish and Wildlife claims these traps “do not result in the death of the captured animal, or in the potential for significant injury such as is possible will steel- jawed leg hold traps.“ Hunters say these traps are more “humane” than previous versions, but these traps are just as cruel as those FoA helped ban in NJ more than 30 years ago.